Sunday, April 3, 2011

Beginnings



Third graders have begun the armature for their papier-mache masks. We begin by stuffing a paper lunch bag with crumpled newspaper pages, and then features are added with toilet paper rolls, egg cartons, cereal box cardboard, bottlecaps, styrofoam balls, etc, and carefully placed masking tape. The kids learn that "tape doesn't stick to air or sunlight", so they pinch it in tightly to whatever is being taped. The learned to cut tabs to flare out at the bottom of cardboard tubes, and they learned to tape over this in the shape of a tic tac toe board to secure it on well. We've just begun, but expect to see ears, horns, beaks, and more. I'll post more down the road...



And we've now done step two on our 2nd grade teddy bear chairs - adding the posts on the back. Next step will be to add the backs, and then we'll paint.


10 comments:

  1. I'm still having blogger problems. All those crazy spaces in between things, and possibly at the top of the blog - I didn't put them there. As a matter of fact, I have gotten rid of them several times and they keep reappearing. Creepy. When I edit them away, it looks fine until I publish. Darn.

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  2. How many session do you think you will need to complete this project?

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  3. For the masks: let's see - we talked and did a lot of demo the first day and started armatures, and they will finish the structure in their next art class. Then I'm planning 2 class periods for papier-mache - since we'll be emptying the masks out (cut open the back of the bag and remove the newspaper inside), they need to have more than on layer! Then we'll take one class for a coat of gesso, unless I have them do a final papier-mache coat w/white paper towels to save time. I tell the kids the papier-mache is the skin,and the gesso is the underwear!(I use gesso since it adds strength). Then about 3 more classes - for painting, and embellishing w/stuff like yarn hair, etc. Let me add that up: it totals eight sessions, or probably nine since we know some kids are slower, or absent, etc. I'm working hard to keep them on task because my goal is that they be DONE and ready to display at a K-12 art show in May 17, statewide budget vote day.

    The teddy bear chairs are done differently. While working on something else, the kids are called on 2 or 3 at a time to add the legs, the back posts, and finally the backs. So that's 4 sessions to build, but it is a one minute process each time! Dip the paper tube into glue, stick it on the chair! I plan 2 sessions for painting; no need to gesso.

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  4. Boy, I guess I could have answered that question without taking half a page to do it! Sorry!

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  5. LOL,I can see it is going to be a lengthy and ambitious project. I like the way you use humor to explain things to the students.

    I am looking forward to see the final product.

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  6. Wow! I love seeing the process and feel good that you too do projects that take a looong time. It's fun to do projects that the kids get really invested in. Everything always takes so much longer then expected especially when you haven't done it before. This clay project that I thought would take 3 weeks took 2 months! I only see them once a week. But in the long run they learned a lot and will remember it because they got to work every part of the process. Anyone can cover a plastic mask for with paper mache (which is what we do) but to create their own form is really a learning experience (which takes time.) We are lucky to be art teachers and have the luxury of deeply exploring a topic instead of having to "cover" material.

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  7. Phyl,
    How do you get all of your paper tubes and such? Do you send out mass emails asking for supplies? When I asked for dryer lint last year for a Studio art weaving project- everyone thought I was crazy (even the kids).
    BTW- You have your dragon, check out my octopus.
    http://willdraw4chocolate.blogspot.com/2011/04/papier-mache-time.html

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  8. Jenn, I do two things: I send out "all staff" emails and I send a cute little note home w/kids when they will need a certain material. I have collected cardboard rolls, newspaper, old CD's, cereal boxes, fabric scraps, cube tissue boxes (great for transporting home coil pots from air dry clay), and more, but I've never asked for dryer lint!!!! I find bags of stuff by my classroom door most mornings, some better than others.

    Love your octopus!

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  9. I can't wait to start on the paper mache masks with my 4th graders. What do you use for your paste? Thanks!

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  10. @maciwoof - I use Art Paste - either the School Specialty brand or Elmer's. It comes in a little box and mixes to make 4 quarts. It's not the strongest papier-mache paste (Elmers/water mix or wallpaper paste are stronger) but can be stored indefinitely without mold, cleans up easily, and is non-toxic/non-staining.

    Good luck! Let me know how it goes! The kids will love love LOVE it!!

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